Pap-a-Pap

Pippa Middleton worked for a while in an office behind ours. Fairly frequently on my way to work I'd get caught up in the crossfire between her and the paparazzi. Turns out they don't particularly appreciate you taking photos of them, after doing so these two followed me up the road. Haven't spotted my picture in Grazia yet though...

 

A Pap catching the Ecclestone's out shopping at Christies. The number plates on the Lamborghini, Rolls Royces, and Security Cars, were S7UNT.  29.4.14

Pap-a-Pap: the Hollywood Costume Party at the V&A

A photo posted by Dan Millest (@danmillest) on

My Most Important Achievement

You know that moment where you are torn between trying to write down the exact words someone is saying and absorbing everything that is said?

Tonight I attended the 90th Birthday concert of composer Ray Steadman Allen who over the course of his career has composed and had published over 2000 compositions, gaining a global influence for his technically brilliant writing and acclaimed music.

When asked what his most important achievement was he replied: "Being part of telling people that Jesus died for their sins and that he has risen again. That is the most important thing and it has been a great privilege to play my role."

My phone died half way through writing down the next bit but he went on to say that the highest calling is not to be a composer, although the music had been important, but the highest calling was to be a child of God.

I really want to know this, in a way that effects everything that I am. To run with the gifts God has given me, doing my best, whilst knowing that whatever happens I will always be his Son.

That would be a good use of 90 years, a great achievement. 

Arbitrarily Ever After...

"It's not that humans don't have rights, they do, it's that secular humanism is incoherent in articulating these rights and impotent in acting to defend them."     - Stephen Backhouse

I posted this quote on Facebook and got some interesting backlash from both sides.

Not to sure how much I agree with it, on the one had liberal freedom is founded on 'freedom-from' so does tend toward the individual having to arbitrate on moral issues but on the other it created a society which arbitrates amongst itself so the individual is not totally alone.

Saying that despite arbitrating together we do seem to be very lonely as a society and Stephen went on to suggest why:

"The freedom of secular humanism, its foundation of liberty and self determination, is a freedom from. Freedom from the restraints that hold us back; superstition, religion, aristocracy et al. So having cast them off the soul finds only one restraint left, itself. The only horizon for which to aim, itself."